The Concordance
 
 A....................280
A TREATISE (UNFINISHED) UPON THESE 1, 127/ 2
doctrine. For what would a man give for a 1, 128/ 17
a man give for a sure medicine that were 1, 128/ 18
words giveth us all a sure medicine (if we 1, 128/ 21
and therein writeth sometimes a costly receipt of many 1, 128/ 29
world." Here is first a short medicine containing only 1, 129/ 3
short medicine is of a marvelous force, able to 1, 129/ 6
man have so sure a medicine, so ready at 1, 129/ 13
than he will take a little treacle before. Thou 1, 129/ 16
it for so great a profit? But yet this 1, 129/ 19
medicine, though thou make a sour face at it 1, 129/ 20
them withal. Now if a man be so dainty 1, 129/ 24
would grudge to take a little treacle, yet were 1, 129/ 26
at the leastwise take a little vinegar and rose 1, 129/ 27
of death alone, if a man consider it and 1, 129/ 30
were able to bereave a man of all the 1, 129/ 31
and consideration of death, a man should add and 1, 129/ 33
boldly affirm it for a thing too painful, busily 1, 130/ 8
yet durst I lay a wager that of those 1, 130/ 9
lost, but so great a pleasure grow thereby that 1, 130/ 16
very true pleasure, but a false counterfeit image of 1, 130/ 25
content and satisfied with a beryl or crystal well-counterfeited 1, 130/ 29
crystal well-counterfeited, as with a right natural diamond. But 1, 130/ 30
it bringeth therewith such a grudge and grief of 1, 131/ 7
of the better, as a sow content with draff 1, 131/ 10
his own head against a post, and yet there 1, 131/ 14
but little hurt, by a knock of his head 1, 131/ 23
For the heart of a wicked wretch is like 1, 131/ 28
wicked wretch is like a stormy sea that cannot 1, 131/ 28
that cannot rest, except a man be fallen down 1, 131/ 29
his head. For when a sinner is once fallen 1, 131/ 30
the depth, he waxeth a desperate wretch and setteth 1, 131/ 31
so he that by a mischievous custom of sin 1, 132/ 1
this notwithstanding, like as a sick man feeleth no 1, 132/ 17
root, there is not a more meet instrument than 1, 132/ 32
that it is not a fantasy found of mine 1, 133/ 11
shall bring therewith to a Christian man, not only 1, 133/ 14
counsel, not only that a man may be joyful 1, 133/ 24
it may stand for a very certain token that 1, 134/ 23
very certain token that a penitent beginneth to profit 1, 134/ 24
God when he feeleth a pleasure and quickness in 1, 134/ 25
as I say, that a man feeleth in this 1, 134/ 32
feeleth in this pain a pleasure he hath a 1, 134/ 32
a pleasure he hath a token of great grace 1, 134/ 33
saith, our Lord loveth a glad giver. And on 1, 135/ 1
such spiritual business with a dullness of spirit and 1, 135/ 3
follow that the farther a man proceeded in the 1, 135/ 11
to himself, to conceive a delight and pleasure in 1, 135/ 21
so effectual that if a man remember it well 1, 135/ 32
is not enough that a man do none evil 1, 135/ 34
whole audience, which is a thing far better and 1, 136/ 34
good, rather to keep a good silence thyself, than 1, 137/ 3
showeth the mind walking a pilgrimage, in such wise 1, 137/ 16
suddenly say to them: "A penny for your thoughts 1, 137/ 18
know that there is a God, which thou not 1, 138/ 18
in essay and make a proof, thou shalt well 1, 138/ 23
thereby shall we make a proof what marvelous effect 1, 138/ 30
like as death maketh a severance of the body 1, 139/ 8
hoverly, as one heareth a word and let it 1, 139/ 17
nor the apparition of a very ghost, is half 1, 139/ 28
one had put up a knife into the same 1, 140/ 13
been content with such a change -- think what 1, 140/ 15
meet in the midst. A stroke of a staff 1, 140/ 20
midst. A stroke of a staff, a cut of 1, 140/ 20
stroke of a staff, a cut of a knife 1, 140/ 20
staff, a cut of a knife, the flesh singed 1, 140/ 20
the extreme point, with a great loud cry he 1, 141/ 1
his holy body into a glorious form and made 1, 141/ 6
not ere this, in a sore sickness, felt it 1, 141/ 16
to, when it was a pain to speak? Think 1, 141/ 18
that it will be a gentle pleasure, when we 1, 141/ 19
was about to say, a pleasant thing to see 1, 141/ 24
hear at thine ear a rabble of fleshly friends 1, 141/ 25
they ask for upon a red fire, so thou 1, 142/ 2
there one thing which a little I touched before 1, 142/ 4
first mother, Eve, in a train, and thereby drawing 1, 142/ 10
to run about like a ramping lion, looking whom 1, 142/ 18
then he either winneth a man forever, or forever 1, 142/ 21
side, if he catch a man fast at the 1, 142/ 30
putteth in our mind a love yet and cleaving 1, 143/ 7
security of salvation as a thing well won by 1, 143/ 11
doing any more, as a thing that either needeth 1, 143/ 14
under black hoods, and a gay hearse, with the 1, 143/ 19
he should stand in a window and see how 1, 143/ 21
of many that of a shameful, sinful life have 1, 144/ 3
at all, or but a slight and uncertain sight 1, 144/ 12
and uncertain sight, as a man may see a 1, 144/ 13
a man may see a thing so far off 1, 144/ 13
not whether it be a bush or a beast 1, 144/ 14
be a bush or a beast. And surely so 1, 144/ 14
thereat afar off through a great long space of 1, 144/ 15
but she might have a child, so is there 1, 144/ 19
were to reckon that a young man may die 1, 144/ 24
live long, but within a little while die the 1, 144/ 25
we think how merry a thing it were to 1, 144/ 35
and ever sick of a perilous sickness, wouldst thou 1, 145/ 16
ye not that many a man is infected with 1, 145/ 21
with the great sickness a good while ere he 1, 145/ 22
fain once or twice a day to swaddle and 1, 145/ 32
there lie speechless as a dead stock an hour 1, 146/ 6
bodies have so sore a sickness and such a 1, 146/ 13
a sickness and such a continual consumption in themselves 1, 146/ 14
that once or twice a day we be fain 1, 146/ 16
fain to fall in a swoon which we call 1, 146/ 26
like dead stocks by a long space ere we 1, 146/ 27
that this is but a fantasy. For though we 1, 146/ 30
hunger sickness and meat a medicine, yet men know 1, 146/ 31
thee what thou callest a sickness. Is not that 1, 146/ 34
sickness. Is not that a sickness that will make 1, 147/ 1
What callest thou, then, a medicine? Is it not 1, 147/ 5
Is it not such a thing as either applied 1, 147/ 5
properly and more verily a medicine than is our 1, 147/ 9
sickness, that is but a custom of calling, by 1, 147/ 13
but we name sickness a passion that cometh seldomer 1, 147/ 17
all lepers, which is a sickness rather foul and 1, 147/ 27
sometimes the itch of a sore leg when thou 1, 148/ 1
whole life is but a sickness never curable, but 1, 148/ 3
upon death, not as a stranger, but as a 1, 148/ 9
a stranger, but as a nigh neighbor. For as 1, 148/ 9
no time after that a man hath once life 1, 148/ 21
from this town -- a man is not only 1, 149/ 9
forward. And therefore, if a man met him by 1, 149/ 11
methinketh that in likewise a man is not only 1, 149/ 16
meseemeth that reason proveth, a man is always dying 1, 149/ 23
look towards death as a thing far off, considering 1, 149/ 32
think this reason but a sophistical subtlety, and thinkest 1, 149/ 35
thinkest while thou art a young man thou mayest 1, 149/ 36
notwithstanding that it were a hundred times as long 1, 150/ 10
that he had thereby a hundred times as long 1, 150/ 11
Reckon me now yourself a young man in your 1, 150/ 13
upon thy death as a thing far off, but 1, 151/ 3
thing far off, but a thing undoubtedly nigh thee 1, 151/ 3
thee. By which, not a false imagination but a 1, 151/ 4
a false imagination but a very true contemplation, thou 1, 151/ 5
it carrieth with it a blindness almost incurable, save 1, 153/ 34
under the color of a faithful hope of heaven 1, 155/ 8
hope of heaven, as a thing more than due 1, 155/ 8
of their death, is a right effectual ointment long 1, 155/ 13
as they cannot with a sure sight look upon 1, 155/ 15
praise of the people, a blast of wind of 1, 155/ 28
Lord God, how slight a thing it would seem 1, 156/ 1
-- he shall within a few years, and only 1, 156/ 8
playeth the lord in a stage play, wouldst thou 1, 156/ 16
he shall go walk a knave in his old 1, 156/ 18
I shall put thee a more earnest image of 1, 156/ 24
condition, and that not a feigned similitude but a 1, 156/ 25
a feigned similitude but a very true fashion and 1, 156/ 25
prisoners, and be within a sure prison, out of 1, 156/ 29
awhile, some bound to a post, some wandering abroad 1, 157/ 13
one, now other, sometimes a great rabble at once 1, 157/ 20
and shifted out in a sheet, be put to 1, 157/ 22
build in the prison a palace for your blood 1, 157/ 26
blood, is it not a great royalty if it 1, 157/ 26
Tower of Babylon in a corner of the prison 1, 157/ 27
ye be dead, setteth a strange prisoner in your 1, 157/ 30
forget that it is a prison. For if ye 1, 157/ 33
matter aright, the place a prison, yourself a prisoner 1, 157/ 34
place a prison, yourself a prisoner condemned to death 1, 158/ 1
as worshipful as if a gentleman thief, when he 1, 158/ 2
Tyburn, would leave for a memorial the arms of 1, 158/ 3
his ancestors painted on a post in Newgate. Surely 1, 158/ 4
not true figure for a fantasy, but reckoned it 1, 158/ 5
but one prisoner bearing a rule among the remnant 1, 158/ 10
which is undoubtedly both a sore torment and a 1, 158/ 16
a sore torment and a very consumption. For surely 1, 158/ 16
surely envy is such a torment as all the 1, 158/ 17
of Sicily never devised a sorer. And it so 1, 158/ 18
pale, and wan, that a person well set a 1, 158/ 21
a person well set a work with envy needeth 1, 158/ 21
his own face in a glass. This vice is 1, 158/ 22
gave them so great a fall by their own 1, 159/ 7
forth that one Publius, a Roman, when he saw 1, 159/ 12
he, "either Mutius hath a shrewd turn himself, or 1, 159/ 14
or some man else a good turn," noting that 1, 159/ 15
putting in remembrance of a certain fable of Aesop 1, 159/ 20
and finding together in a place two men, the 1, 159/ 25
give each of them a gift, but there should 1, 159/ 26
so mad to envy a poor soul for playing 1, 160/ 20
also couldst thou envy a perpetual sick man, a 1, 160/ 22
a perpetual sick man, a man that carrieth his 1, 160/ 22
death's wound with him, a man that is but 1, 160/ 23
man that is but a prisoner damned to death 1, 160/ 23
prisoner damned to death, a man that is in 1, 160/ 23
should of reason be a great remedy thereof. For 1, 160/ 27
were that thou knewest a great duke, keeping so 1, 160/ 33
house that thou, being a right mean man hadst 1, 160/ 35
hadst in thine heart a great envy thereat, and 1, 160/ 36
marriage of his child a great honorable court above 1, 161/ 1
wrath sometimes riseth upon a wrong done us, as 1, 161/ 29
this waywardness, but of a secret root of setting 1, 162/ 9
knoweth and acknowledgeth for a great deal his better 1, 162/ 22
which it appeareth by a common consent that a 1, 163/ 3
a common consent that a man's own estimation, setting 1, 163/ 3
if one give another a dry blow with his 1, 163/ 9
blood upon him with a sword. The cause is 1, 163/ 10
that three strokes with a sword could not anger 1, 163/ 13
should appear that by a blow given him with 1, 163/ 14
blow given him with a bare hand any man 1, 163/ 14
far reckon him for a boy that he would 1, 163/ 15
anger that we call a good zeal riseth of 1, 163/ 21
own ruin, is but a cursed branch rising and 1, 164/ 12
it is in physic a special thing necessary to 1, 164/ 15
to take to heart a lewd, rebukeful word spoken 1, 165/ 10
be as he is, a poor prisoner damned to 1, 165/ 11
to be wroth with a wretched prisoner, with him 1, 165/ 21
with him that were a dying? And of this 1, 165/ 22
And of this would a man be the more 1, 165/ 22
when they should see a ramping lion coming on 1, 165/ 39
of covetousness, which is a sickness wherein men be 1, 166/ 14
is common among men: a man unto whom God 1, 167/ 9
to enjoy it, but a stranger devoureth." Of such 1, 167/ 12
speaketh the psalmist, thus: "A man disquieteth himself in 1, 167/ 13
faithful promise than hath a Jew or a Turk 1, 167/ 32
hath a Jew or a Turk. Doth not holy 1, 167/ 32
yet if thou be a faithful man, thou shalt 1, 169/ 4
men their meat by a crow), or else his 1, 169/ 16
sore, cannot get thee a penny the more) conform 1, 169/ 20
thou shalt go into a better bosom, into heaven 1, 169/ 29
he hap to have a great loss, in what 1, 170/ 10
would have thought himself a great rich man, where 1, 170/ 14
it naughtly, ye have a cause to be glad 1, 170/ 22
come into heaven, as a great cable or a 1, 170/ 35
a great cable or a camel to go through 1, 170/ 35
camel to go through a needle's eye. For it 1, 171/ 1
of God, and of a disposer reckoneth himself an 1, 171/ 10
his own, he casteth a love thereto, and so 1, 171/ 12
it would have been a great let. And no 1, 172/ 5
not easy to find a good time to give 1, 172/ 8
seemeth to preach to a glutton for fasting when 1, 172/ 15
good meat, or to a lusty lecher when his 1, 172/ 16
I remember me of a thief once cast at 1, 172/ 18
at Newgate, that cut a purse at the bar 1, 172/ 18
walk pit pat upon a pair of pattens with 1, 172/ 32
as greedy to get a groat by the beguiling 1, 172/ 35
plight they shall lie a dying, while their executors 1, 173/ 21
all our life but a very gay golden dream 1, 174/ 2
and leave thee scant a sheet. Which thing, if 1, 174/ 20
of gluttony, which is a beastly sickness and an 1, 174/ 28
knowledge made in manner a goddess, yet took she 1, 174/ 31
the soul, with what a burden chargeth he the 1, 175/ 33
be to the soul a prison, how strait a 1, 176/ 2
a prison, how strait a prison maketh he the 1, 176/ 3
hand and foot, in a strait stocks that he 1, 176/ 5
so stifled in such a stuffed body that it 1, 176/ 6
were, enclosed, not in a prison but in a 1, 176/ 9
a prison but in a grave, dead in manner 1, 176/ 9
needs must it be a deadly enemy to the 1, 176/ 15
belly standing a-strut like a tabor, and his noll 1, 176/ 20
down and sleep like a swine. And who doubteth 1, 176/ 22
are wont to write a short riddle on the 1, 176/ 24
shameful? Is it not a beastly thing to see 1, 177/ 9
beastly thing to see a man that hath reason 1, 177/ 9
borne to bed as a corpse were borne in 1, 177/ 13
would not rather take a short pain for the 1, 177/ 25
of everlasting pleasure, than a short pleasure for the 1, 177/ 26
much is it then a more madness to take 1, 177/ 28
Holy Writ is but a dull proof. For our 1, 178/ 9
so might we call a man of India white 1, 178/ 18
if thou shouldst, for a little itch, claw thyself 1, 178/ 19
though it liked thee a little in the beginning 1, 178/ 21
and win thereby, not a little pain, but an 1, 178/ 23
and then fall to a rere-supper. If God would 1, 179/ 2
philosopher Plutarch saith) like a lewd master of a 1, 180/ 4
a lewd master of a ship that goeth not 1, 180/ 4
his ship fall on a leak, and then careth 1, 180/ 6
famine, we thereof make a great matter -- we 1, 180/ 13
And if there be a man slain of a 1, 180/ 19
a man slain of a stroke, there is, as 1, 180/ 19
at all. Now if a man willingly kill himself 1, 180/ 27
willingly kill himself with a knife, the world wondereth 1, 180/ 27
corpse cast out on a dunghill, his body never 1, 180/ 29
part and office of a natural man and reasonable 1, 181/ 2
in three drops with a spoon, and yet spew 1, 181/ 14
Often have they had a sick drunken head, and 1, 181/ 15
then shall they feel a swimming and aching in 1, 181/ 16
of sloth men make a small matter. Sloth is 1, 181/ 31
small matter. Sloth is a sin so common, and 1, 181/ 32
take it as for a laughing matter and a 1, 182/ 5
a laughing matter and a sport. But surely since 1, 182/ 6
surely since it is a great capital sin indeed 1, 182/ 7