The Concordance
 
 A..................351
and set forth such a pestilent opinion against ourselves 7, 111/ 23
it may be as a wholesome treacle at your 7, 112/ 8
put forth among you a book that he named 7, 112/ 17
Supplication for the Beggars, a book indeed nothing less 7, 112/ 18
all) to bring many a good simple soul, for 7, 113/ 12
he had set him a work with that pernicious 7, 114/ 9
as he, made such a book for beggars that 7, 114/ 13
believe him, especially telling a thing so far incredible 7, 114/ 19
study the means whereby a Christian man should think 7, 114/ 22
helped to devise it, a simple reader might by 7, 114/ 30
and venomed; yet if a wise man well warned 7, 114/ 31
favor unto poor folk, a devilish desire of noyance 7, 115/ 3
as dead. He deviseth a piteous bill of complaint 7, 115/ 6
maketh, as he thinketh, a plain and open reckoning 7, 115/ 22
After this he gathereth a great heap of evils 7, 116/ 5
to the king for a license to rail upon 7, 116/ 13
of London was in a great rage for indicting 7, 116/ 25
because he had sued a praemunire against a priest 7, 116/ 31
sued a praemunire against a priest for suing him 7, 116/ 32
the spiritual court in a matter determinable in the 7, 116/ 32
who that justly punish a priest by the temporal 7, 117/ 12
that of necessity for a special remedy the king 7, 117/ 14
king must needs grant a license to such lewd 7, 117/ 14
to the readers at a sudden show, we leave 7, 118/ 2
and answering of such a mad malicious book we 7, 118/ 14
life we give now a hard and a heavy 7, 118/ 16
now a hard and a heavy reckoning; yet not 7, 118/ 16
his purpose should have a great face of charity 7, 118/ 33
as to fall upon a wiser scrivener to make 7, 119/ 21
supplication, but upon such a one as under his 7, 119/ 22
wit that, beginning with a cloak of charity, doth 7, 119/ 24
the show. Wherein, like a beggar's proctor he goeth 7, 119/ 27
that were too long a work, whereof we fear 7, 120/ 1
so to lay as a lie to his charge 7, 120/ 16
tell him that for a beginning in these few 7, 120/ 20
neither, bring you forth a bead-roll of their names 7, 120/ 24
one that hath but a poor boil upon his 7, 121/ 9
was the pain of a great botch that grieved 7, 121/ 10
hand little more than a month before. So that 7, 121/ 11
he showeth further for a sure truth a thing 7, 123/ 7
for a sure truth a thing that all men 7, 123/ 7
men know surely for a great lie: that is 7, 123/ 8
freres hath every quarter a penny. For we know 7, 123/ 10
also that in many a parish in England, of 7, 123/ 17
pay neither five pence a quarter nor four neither 7, 123/ 18
four neither, and many a parish never a penny 7, 123/ 19
many a parish never a penny. And as for 7, 123/ 19
this thing being such a stark lie, as many 7, 123/ 22
it, he putteth as a plain, well-known truth for 7, 123/ 24
plain, well-known truth for a special post to bear 7, 123/ 24
grounds now maketh he a clear reckoning in this 7, 123/ 25
every of these households a penny a quarter. Summa 7, 123/ 31
these households a penny a quarter. Summa, for every 7, 123/ 32
but to teach you a point of reckoning and 7, 124/ 9
that twenty shillings make a pound. But who can 7, 124/ 26
that of so great a sum he leaveth not 7, 124/ 28
quarter of every household a penny; this reckoning of 7, 124/ 32
if he would make a reckoning with you that 7, 125/ 1
one ass, ye make a lip and think it 7, 125/ 7
such. Surely it were a mad count indeed, and 7, 125/ 9
freres, beginning with such a great exclamation that we 7, 125/ 23
and that in such a sort and fashion that 7, 126/ 25
but also madly, like a fond fellow, laying much 7, 126/ 34
figure, he falleth to a vehement invocation of the 7, 127/ 29
Grace. This tale is a very likely thing, as 7, 128/ 9
all his hot accusation a very cold tale when 7, 128/ 31
by the grant of a thousand marks, we dare 7, 129/ 2
neither can show such a grant nor never could 7, 129/ 4
whom, he saith, being a traitor to the king 7, 129/ 13
beggars' proctor writeth for a false foundation of his 7, 129/ 29
wild words of such a malicious makebate, which for 7, 130/ 7
they call their jurisdiction a kingdom. In which word 7, 130/ 9
this man useth as a proof thereof that the 7, 130/ 12
him be taken as a heretic. We be well 7, 130/ 30
any man taken for a heretic did so much 7, 130/ 32
This lie, lo, is a little too loud for 7, 131/ 2
if any man trouble a priest for any temporal 7, 131/ 4
forthwith will make him a heretic and burn him 7, 131/ 5
be content to bear a faggot for their pleasure 7, 131/ 6
know well in many a shire how often that 7, 131/ 7
as there is sometimes a rape committed in deed 7, 131/ 9
so is there ever a rape surmised, were the 7, 131/ 9
troubled for indicting of a priest. So that his 7, 131/ 20
which he paid for a fine by the praemunire 7, 131/ 25
Grace may see what a work there is in 7, 132/ 2
were about that matter a great commotion in all 7, 132/ 8
the King's Highness for a truth, whereof neither bishop 7, 132/ 10
any date. So that a man would ween he 7, 132/ 15
would ween he were a fool that so writeth 7, 132/ 15
he doth it for a wiliness. For since he 7, 132/ 17
other. But finally for a special point he bringeth 7, 132/ 21
action of praemunire against a priest, he had been 7, 132/ 23
writ of praemunire against a priest that wrongfully held 7, 133/ 13
him in plea in a spiritual court, for a 7, 133/ 14
a spiritual court, for a matter whereof the knowledge 7, 133/ 15
somewhat cumbered you with a piece of his own 7, 133/ 26
because ye should have a show of his vehement 7, 133/ 27
to ask the king a question, and to bind 7, 133/ 29
the spiritual law for a matter determinable in the 7, 134/ 30
the matter was for a mortuary, which by plain 7, 134/ 31
pardon. Wherein he layeth a good great sum, to 7, 135/ 6
that His Highness as a most virtuous prince useth 7, 135/ 27
to give counsel to a king, when he showeth 7, 137/ 5
to ask the king a question and appoint him 7, 137/ 7
March hare, but as a mad dog that runneth 7, 137/ 12
hath some similitude of a man, and as a 7, 137/ 19
a man, and as a fox hath a certain 7, 137/ 19
as a fox hath a certain wiliness somewhat resembling 7, 137/ 19
seem very wise, within a while in the progress 7, 137/ 27
progress he proveth himself a very stark fool. And 7, 137/ 27
clergy give them never a groat; and as though 7, 138/ 3
at Saint Savior's with a sore leg; but he 7, 138/ 14
herein he showeth also a high point of his 7, 138/ 24
be not one to a hundred, then shall ye 7, 139/ 1
there be more men a great many in London 7, 139/ 5
that is multiplied by a hundred. All his practice 7, 139/ 9
he will give you a hundred for one. Whereof 7, 139/ 11
do by his foundation, a thousand monks were too 7, 139/ 14
is meet to be a beggars' proctor, that can 7, 139/ 19
help. It is therefore a world to see what 7, 139/ 23
would fain show himself a man of great experience 7, 140/ 6
bended themselves there as a party against the temporal 7, 140/ 18
lords spiritual moved was a thing that nothing pertained 7, 140/ 25
than the clergy, is a very feeble device. But 7, 141/ 20
money? Nay, nay, not a groat. What other thing 7, 142/ 7
King's Grace will build a sure hospital that never 7, 142/ 9
them. Is not here a goodly mischief for a 7, 142/ 12
a goodly mischief for a remedy? Is not this 7, 142/ 12
remedy? Is not this a royal feast to leave 7, 142/ 12
and as angrily as a new hunted sow. And 7, 142/ 33
held the same year, a bill put in declaring 7, 143/ 6
weened he had made a very just account. And 7, 143/ 9
nor well what thing a knight's fee is; but 7, 143/ 14
still among the people, a great number of them 7, 143/ 21
then forthwith were there a rabble of heretics gathered 7, 144/ 2
sheep's heads, three for a penny, buy who would 7, 144/ 7
and made some gaggling a while, but it availed 7, 144/ 13
as he thinketh, by a proper invention likely to 7, 144/ 17
when they have taken a man's money from him 7, 145/ 19
For he fareth as a cruel thief that would 7, 145/ 21
his own commodity, take a man's money from him 7, 145/ 22
bind the man to a tree and beat him 7, 145/ 23
them, is there many a good man that hath 7, 145/ 36
lived full godly many a fair day and duly 7, 146/ 1
an old man, many a sore sick man, and 7, 146/ 2
spiritual things, is it a great thing if we 7, 146/ 29
should serve him for a discharge of hand labor 7, 147/ 18
clergy. For there was a small clergy when that 7, 147/ 26
if he call it a precept, as he doth 7, 147/ 27
kind of man, as a thing by God commanded 7, 147/ 28
unto them and sent a begging too all those 7, 148/ 1
would he then within a while after make another 7, 148/ 7
you soon after, in a new supplication, new bald 7, 149/ 3
should be able for a sudden shift to make 7, 149/ 8
sudden shift to make a strong party. And surely 7, 149/ 9
Cobham, called Oldcastle, sometime a captain of heretics in 7, 149/ 30
tempereth his matter with a goodly visage of the 7, 150/ 2
the man hath caught a great pleasure to appose 7, 150/ 7
king, wherein he useth a figure of rhetoric that 7, 150/ 8
railing against the clergy, a principal part of his 7, 150/ 14
they that have made a hundred thousand idle whores 7, 150/ 18
ye wot well, many a fair day? And now 7, 151/ 10
earthly therein but even a pennyweight of wit. For 7, 152/ 2
right now so small a part of people that 7, 152/ 4
part of people that a little would suffice for 7, 152/ 5
for one out of a hundred is no very 7, 152/ 11
nor one added to a hundred no very perceivable 7, 152/ 12
if men saw such a sudden necessity, rather marry 7, 152/ 29
For except he were a wondrous sad man of 7, 153/ 33
earnestly in so mad a matter. Yet one thing 7, 153/ 34
they should, it were a very strange fashion to 7, 154/ 6
and cast out on a dunghill the blessed sacraments 7, 154/ 18
he shooteth at, as a special point and foundation 7, 154/ 21
of his is indeed a great, broad, bottomless ocean 7, 154/ 25
idle people be set a work. Then shall matrimony 7, 155/ 16
with them? Were this a diminishment of sick and 7, 156/ 4
monk, and frere hath a wife. As soon as 7, 156/ 12
and virtue that scant a devil could find in 7, 156/ 20
he is too very a villain that would serve 7, 156/ 24
bucks broken out of a park. Over this, how 7, 156/ 33
of heresy, bearing of a faggot, or burning. Can 7, 157/ 8
he saith, "be set a work." By what means 7, 157/ 16
to set idle men a work? But if he 7, 157/ 17
men shall be set a work by them whom 7, 157/ 18
he should confess himself a fool. "Then shall your 7, 158/ 24
the people and make a dole of the freres' 7, 158/ 28
the gaping is for a new gospel. Men have 7, 159/ 6
set you in such a lewd liberty. This and 7, 159/ 31
liberty. This and many a mad frantic folly shall 7, 159/ 32
but he maketh thereof a secret overture, leaving it 7, 160/ 4
lest we declaring such a horrible carrion of evil 7, 160/ 10
thing put forth like a riddle, hard to read 7, 160/ 16
that should be such a horrible carrion of evil 7, 160/ 25
small enormities, and, as a man would say, little 7, 161/ 8
reckoneth in the clergy a more horrible carrion than 7, 162/ 26
that His Highness as a prince of excellent erudition 7, 162/ 31
toward the King's Grace a very wise fashion of 7, 163/ 19
His Highness were such a minister of righteousness as 7, 163/ 23
not perceive, so great a matter and such a 7, 163/ 26
a matter and such a horrible carrion of evil 7, 163/ 26
as ye see, under a fond face of flattery 7, 164/ 6
in that he allegeth a book for him that 7, 164/ 28
well that they had a clergy thousands of years 7, 165/ 13
him. For there was a clergy as soon as 7, 165/ 19
that clergy had not a part of the Christian 7, 165/ 20
could not have found a book that made more 7, 165/ 29
to have) enough and a great deal more. For 7, 167/ 3
the false faith of a fond frere, of old 7, 167/ 15
would, in so great a thing, so fully and 7, 170/ 15
of malice and of a very deadly devilish hate 7, 170/ 27
and so changed into a wild, fierce, cruel appetite 7, 171/ 5
the frail commodities of a little worldly living, labor 7, 171/ 12
his enemy behind him a little prick with the 7, 171/ 19
intent under color of a great zeal toward the 7, 171/ 22
point was there never a clearer example than this 7, 172/ 10
nature of man into a brutish, beastly persuasion as 7, 172/ 29
idolaters have ever had a certain opinion and persuasion 7, 173/ 5
there hath always remained a glimmering that hath gone 7, 173/ 8
wantonly doth forsloth -- a very child almost may 7, 173/ 27
goodness say that after a man's conversion once to 7, 173/ 33
use this point for a general rule, that at 7, 174/ 17
and their baptism with a short return again to 7, 174/ 27
well and firmly for a sure truth believe it 7, 175/ 18
be to many folk a good bridle and a 7, 175/ 19
a good bridle and a sharp bit to refrain 7, 175/ 19
shift over in such a trifling manner that it 7, 176/ 15
being as he was a good faithful king, he 7, 176/ 35
by the show of a manifest miracle. But whereto 7, 177/ 12
longed so sore for a longer life. Now if 7, 177/ 20
that place alone is a far better proof for 7, 177/ 27
say that purgatory is a thing of the pope's 7, 177/ 34
their fellowship rather of a light mind and lewd 7, 178/ 7
lewd pleasure to take a part, than of any 7, 178/ 8
that they were in a prison of punishment. And 7, 178/ 32
glutton lying in such a lake, from whence, at 7, 179/ 7
find they here? Surely a very shameless shift, and 7, 180/ 4
naught, they fall to a shameless boldness and let 7, 180/ 12
whereof remaineth so noble a monument and remembrance continually 7, 181/ 23
this place it is a world to see the 7, 185/ 6
abide, he shall have a reward. If any man's 7, 187/ 15
which the one is a light flame soon ended 7, 188/ 25
ye never can conceive a very right imagination of 7, 188/ 36
be by ship conveyed a long journey by sea 7, 189/ 8
and sometime soon upon a storm to lie long 7, 189/ 10
amended. And divers that a while had weened they 7, 189/ 18
thus fareth it, as a small thing may be 7, 189/ 28
may be resembled to a great, by the souls 7, 189/ 29
new found fantasy, but a very truth well perceived 7, 191/ 4
blessed saints more than a thousand year ago. Now 7, 191/ 6
say that there is a certain sin which a 7, 191/ 11
a certain sin which a man may so commit 7, 191/ 12
abominable, but that if a man work with God's 7, 191/ 19
once clearly withdrawn from a man, he can never 7, 191/ 31
come. And in such a manner kind of unkindness 7, 192/ 8
show that there is a certain sin so touching 7, 192/ 24
read it might conceive a wrong opinion and a 7, 192/ 27
a wrong opinion and a false fear drawing them 7, 192/ 28
say, that there is a purgatory. Howbeit we shall 7, 193/ 2
that men shall yield a reckoning of every idle 7, 193/ 31
that reckoning is understood a punishment therefor, which shall 7, 194/ 1
so that we not a little marvel either of 7, 194/ 8
which while they join a proud pretense of learning 7, 194/ 12
firmly believed it for a plain truth that they 7, 195/ 24
erroneous heretics, it is a proof full and sufficient 7, 195/ 27
will be taken for a member of Christ's church 7, 195/ 28
church, and is alone a thing sufficient in any 7, 195/ 28
the books of many a holy saint's writing shall 7, 196/ 24
at the first for a spirit, it well appeareth 7, 196/ 28
their pain see such a grisly sight as shall 7, 197/ 20
it. Now it is a world to see with 7, 198/ 3
they fell in such a sleep as many a 7, 198/ 8
a sleep as many a soul sleepeth here, and 7, 198/ 8
once. The first is a great folly, that since 7, 198/ 14
their unwise argument make a countenance to throw it 7, 199/ 6
have said before, give a great occasion to men 7, 199/ 23
most cruel, likewise as a sharp master that chastiseth 7, 199/ 35
is there so special a mention made in the 7, 201/ 7
another man's petition from a little pain or imprisonment 7, 201/ 13
hath need and is a member of the same 7, 202/ 16
Macchabeus gathered and sent a great offering to Jerusalem 7, 203/ 11
gap already with such a bush of thorns as 7, 203/ 22
prick their hands through a pair of hedging gloves 7, 203/ 22
point may they have a marvelous great thing against 7, 203/ 31
by Saint Chrysostom in a sermon of his that 7, 204/ 14
time was far above a thousand year ago, and 7, 204/ 18
for to poor folk, a natural man will give 7, 205/ 25
but if he had a faith that we live 7, 205/ 30
any man should give a priest one penny to 7, 206/ 5
yet because they have a far farther purpose against 7, 206/ 18
yet pull they many a simple soul thence which 7, 206/ 25
likely to be there a full bright and glorious 7, 206/ 27
as it fared between a lewd gallant and a 7, 207/ 18
a lewd gallant and a poor frere. Whom when 7, 207/ 18
saw going barefoot in a great frost and snow 7, 207/ 19
very little pain if a man would remember hell 7, 207/ 21
hell? Then art thou a great fool." "Yea, Master 7, 207/ 22
Then is your mastership a much more fool." Moreover 7, 207/ 24
the other side many a hundred thousand -- that 7, 207/ 29
opinion against purgatory is a plain damnable heresy. Wherefore 7, 207/ 32
with his finger to a flock of fat wethers 7, 208/ 10
this beggars' proctor and a few such of that 7, 208/ 18
his friends were in a far country for debt 7, 208/ 25
part more than many a hundred. Now if these 7, 209/ 6
choice on both sides a certain, and match them 7, 209/ 12
such blessed saints with a sort so far unlike 7, 209/ 13
in which they fell a quaffing with the devil 7, 211/ 12
babble. Should I believe a heretic born of late 7, 211/ 30
could be taken for a sure and certain truth 7, 212/ 2
it is, he saith, a thing of his own 7, 213/ 12
chief head. And many a man is there in 7, 214/ 18
that this part is a plain lie. The other 7, 214/ 19
for the foundation of a chantry. For as for 7, 214/ 28
every whit and never a whit but nothing at 7, 215/ 21
cunning because he had a little smattering in the 7, 215/ 32
For as well shall a bishop or an abbot 7, 216/ 20
shall an earl or a duke. And now when 7, 216/ 22
that they have then a great deal too little 7, 217/ 8
little if there be a purgatory -- added unto 7, 217/ 12
truth that there is a purgatory and that every 7, 217/ 13
first plainly profess himself a plain and undoubted heretic 7, 217/ 19
you so plainly that a child may perceive it 7, 217/ 29
husband, your wife, or a very stranger too, lay 7, 218/ 19
rest abed and let a man lie and burn 7, 218/ 23
of heart and what a sorrowful shame the silly 7, 219/ 4
some doctor to make a sermon at our Mass 7, 220/ 15
take our burying for a bride-ale. For special punishment 7, 220/ 19
the body that hath a hot fever as fervently 7, 221/ 17
old man that found a bag of cherry stones 7, 221/ 29
up when he was a child. What a sorrow 7, 221/ 30
was a child. What a sorrow hath it been 7, 221/ 30
war that had taken a town by force. How 7, 221/ 34
pleaseth God than that a man cared not what 7, 223/ 6
it ourselves, and of a filthy affection toward our 7, 223/ 9
at the leastwise with a poor man's alms. Ye 7, 224/ 30
out much money for a great marriage. Which if 7, 224/ 31
though every one were a prince or a princess 7, 224/ 35
were a prince or a princess of a realm 7, 224/ 35
or a princess of a realm. Finally, all our 7, 224/ 35
we, that have not a brat to put on 7, 225/ 6
of all those passeth a feigned fire painted on 7, 225/ 14
feigned fire painted on a wall. If ever ye 7, 225/ 15
bethink you then what a long night we silly 7, 225/ 17
instead of reasoning, make a game and a jest 7, 226/ 1
make a game and a jest now of our 7, 226/ 1
impossible than to make a born-blind man to perceive 7, 226/ 12
but have in themselves a far more excellent sight 7, 226/ 21
And therefore whoso maketh a mock at our words 7, 226/ 33
he giveth God not a whit, but taketh in 7, 227/ 3
told by God for a very fantastic fable. And 7, 227/ 4
never the malice of a few fond fellows, a 7, 228/ 17
a few fond fellows, a few pestilent persons borne 7, 228/ 17